Normal view MARC view ISBD view

On the controversies behind the origins of the federal economic statistics

by Rockoff, Hugh
Series: NBER working paper series . 25431 Published by : NBER (Cambridge) Physical details: 38 p. Subject(s): Política económica | Preços | Consumo | Grande depressão | Desemprego | Estatística | EUA Year: 2019
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Location Call number Copy Status Date due
Documento de trabalho Documento de trabalho Instituto Superior de Economia e Gestão
ISEG (iseg)
Serial 155//25431 (Browse shelf) 1 Sem empréstimo

Although attempts to measure trends in prices, output, and employment can be traced back for centuries, in the main the origins of the U.S. federal statistics are to be found in bitter debates over economic policy, ultimately debates over the distribution of income, at the end of the nineteenth century and during the world wars and Great Depression. Participants in those debates hoped that statistics that were widely accepted as nonpolitical and accurate would prove that their grievances were just and provide support for the policies they advocated. Economists – including luminaries such as Irving Fisher, Wesley C. Mitchell, and Simon Kuznets – responded by developing the methodology for computing index numbers and estimates of national income. Initially, individuals and private organizations provided these statistics, but by the end of WWII the federal government had taken over the role. Here I briefly describe the cases of prices, GDP, and unemployment.

Click on an image to view it in the image viewer


© 2012, Universidade de Lisboa
Todos os direitos reservados - All rights reserved
Languages: